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Professor David Moore Professorial Research Fellow (ARCSHS), Aust Res Ctr Sex Hlth&Soc

David Moore is a Professorial Research Fellow at the Australian Research Centre in Sex, Health and Society (ARCSHS). He has published extensively in key sociological and health journals on youth, gender, alcohol and other drug use, addiction concepts and drug policy. David is the author of The Lads in Action: Social Process in an Urban Youth Subculture (Arena, 1994), and (with Suzanne Fraser and Helen Keane) Habits: Remaking Addiction (Palgrave, 2014). He also edited (with Paul Dietze) Drugs and Public Health: Australian Perspectives on Policy and Practice (Oxford University Press, 2008) and (with Suzanne Fraser) The Drug Effect: Health, Crime and Society (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

David has held positions at The Australian National University (Anthropology) and Deakin University (Public Health). Prior to joining ARCSHS in mid-2019, he established and led the Ethnographic Program at the National Drug Research Institute at Curtin University (2003-2019), where he retains an adjunct position. Since 2010, he has been Editor of Contemporary Drug Problems and a member of the editorial board for the International Journal of Drug Policy.

David's current research at ARCSHS, funded by the Australian Research Council, focuses on (1) identifying how unexamined concepts, such as gender, influence research and policy on alcohol-related violence in Australia, Canada and Sweden, and (2) exploring injecting practices and harm reduction needs among men who inject performance and image-enhancing drugs.

David's research has been by funded by a range of research bodies:

National competitive grants
• Moore, Keane, Graham and Ekendahl, Analysing gender in research and policy on alcohol-related violence among young people. ARC Discovery Project (2018 – 2021, total: $530,000)
• Fraser, Moore, Seear, Aitken and Stanton, Understanding performance and image enhancing drug injecting in Australia. ARC Discovery Project (2017 – 2019, total: $472,000)
• Fraser, Kokanovic, Moore, Treloar and Dunlop, Experiences of addiction, treatment and recovery: An online resource. ARC Discovery Project (2014 – 2016, total: $499,000)
• Moore, Dietze, Perez and Room, Developing the capacity to model the impact of interventions that target high-risk drinking among young Australians. ARC Discovery Project (2011 – 2013, total: $440,000)
• Hellard, Dietze, Ritter, Lubman, Kinner, Williams, Dore, Maher, Moore and Power, Reducing the health, social and economic burden of injecting drug use in Australia. NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence (2010 – 2015, total: $2,485,000)
• Room, Moore, MacLean, Vandenberg and Goltz, Understanding and reducing alcohol-related harm among young adults in urban settings: Opportunities for intervention. ARC Linkage Project (2010 – 2012, total: $240,000)
• Moore, Dietze, Bammer and Perez, Understanding the barriers to improved access, engagement and retention of methamphetamine users in health services. NHMRC Project Grant (2008 – 2010, total: $756,000)
• Fraser, Treloar and Moore, Under construction: the social and cultural politics of hepatitis C. ARC Discovery Project (2008 – 2010, total: $95,000)
• Moore, Dietze, Maher, Bammer and Clatts, Improving understanding of psychostimulant-related harms in Australia: An integrated ethno-epidemiological approach. NHMRC Project Grant (2005 – 2008, total: $604,000)
• Crofts, Moore and Locarnini, Injecting drug users: Social networks and molecular epidemiology of the hepatitis C virus. NHMRC Project Grant (2000 – 2002, total: $534,000)
• Rumbold, Fitzgerald, Dietze, Morgan, Fry and Moore, An investigation of retail heroin markets from a public health perspective. NHMRC Project Grant (2000 – 2001, total: $188,000)

Selected other competitive grants
• Moore and Lenton, The harms associated with concurrent alcohol and party drug use amongst young people: Risk environments and the implications for prevention. Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation Workforce Development Grant (2005 – 2008, total: $120,000)
• Moore and Northcote, A multi-site investigation of the social meanings of alcohol misuse among young adults in recreational settings. Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation Research Grant (2005 – 2008, total: $308,000)
• Duff, Johnston and Moore, Research into the cultures and contexts of Ecstasy and related drug use in Victoria: New bases for prevention and harm minimisation. Victorian Premier’s Drug Prevention Council Research Grant (2005 – 2006, total: $65,000)
• Moore, Rumbold and Dietze, An ethnographic study of heroin markets and health-related harm in Melbourne. VicHealth Project Grant (2000 – 2003, total: $225,000)

David is available for the supervision of qualitative research focusing on alcohol and other drug use, drugs and gender, drugs and young people, drug policy and drug science.

Positions

Research Areas research areas