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Leanne Higham Lecturer Humanities Eco Bus and Legal, Education

Leanne Higham is a Lecturer in the School of Education at La Trobe University. A former secondary teacher, she is interested in the everyday practices of schooling and how these increase and enhance the capacities of those within schools, and/or limit and constrain them. Leanne's research interests are theoretically and empirically informed by the critical posthumanities and feminist new materialisms. Her work takes a radically empiricist approach towards practical ethics.

Leanne’s PhD, “Slow violence and schools”, is an ethnographic examination of everyday life in two Melbourne government schools. It is a study of un/ethical practices in schools, and their relations with subjectivities. Supervised by Dr Dianne Mulcahy and Prof Jane Kenway at the Melbourne Graduate School of Education, it will be completed in 2020.

Leanne's MEd thesis, "Becoming boy: A/effecting identity in a Catholic boys' school" is an autoethnographic account of subjectivities in a Melbourne Catholic boys' school. In 2016 it was awarded the Melbourne Graduate School of Education Freda Cohen Prize for most meritorious thesis submitted for the Master of Education.

Specialising in humanities and social science education, Leanne's secondary teaching career included leading the History and Politics learning area, as well as teaching history, politics, commerce and geography across years 7 to 12. Beyond schools and universities, she has also worked for the Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority in a range of positions concerned with curriculum review, design, examinations development and assessment for VCE Legal Studies.

As a transdisciplinary scholar, Leanne's work moves across both the Social Justice and Inclusion and Innovative Pedagogies education disciplinary study areas (EDSAs) within the School of Education.

With Dr Tamara Borovica, Leanne is co-convenor of the AARE Poststructural Theory SIG.

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