A smoking cessation program as a resource for bladder cancer patients Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Continued tobacco use following a bladder cancer (CaB) diagnosis puts patients at risk for other tobacco-associated diseases and has also been associated with heightened risks of treatment-related complications, tumour recurrence, morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to determine if patients with CaB who continue to smoke warrant a smoking cessation program as a resource for improving their prognosis and long-term health.A cross-sectional quantitative questionnaire-based study was performed between January and April 2009. We surveyed patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of CaB during their cystoscopy appointments at a single cancer centre.One hundred patients completed the survey with 72% of them admitting to smoking in their lifetime. A third of respondents smoked at the time of their diagnosis; 76% of patients who had been active smokers at the time of their diagnosis (n = 33) reported smoking at some point thereafter and 58% continued to smoke. Among continued smokers, they were classified in the following categories: 26% were in "precontemplation," 5% in "contemplation," 16% in "preparation," and 53% in "action;" 37% of patients who continued to smoke were interested in a hospital-based smoking cessation program. Overall, 70% reported smoking as a risk factor for a poor CaB prognosis. The two most common barriers to quitting were "trouble managing stress and mood" and "fear of gaining weight."Based on the data from our centre, patients with CaB who continue to smoke after their diagnosis warrant a smoking cessation program as a resource for improving prognosis and long-term health. Further research should focus on establishing an efficacious and cost-effective program that provides these patients with the resources they need to quit smoking.

publication date

  • 2012