Both resistance and agility training reduce back pain and improve health-related quality of life in older women with low bone mass Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of three different types of group-based exercise programs (resistance training, agility training and general stretching) on back pain and health-related quality of life in older (aged 75-85 years) community-dwelling women with low bone mass (i.e., osteopenia or osteoporosis). The design was a 25-week randomized controlled trial. Participating were 98 community-dwelling women with low bone mass between the ages of 75 to 85 years old. We assessed back pain and its related disability and health-related quality of life. All three types of group-based exercise programs significantly reduced back pain and its related disabilities, but only resistance and agility training significantly improved health-related quality of life in community-dwelling older women with low bone mass. Baseline physical activity level and class attendance were significant predictors of change in health-related quality of life. Change in back pain and its related disabilities after 25 weeks of exercise intervention was significantly correlated with change in health-related quality of life and changes in the domains of pain and physical function. Resistance and agility training significantly enhanced health-related quality of life and may have done so by increasing social interactions and support, enhancing self-efficacy of physical abilities and modifying the experience of back pain. These data provide valuable insight into the specifics of exercise prescription for older women with low bone mass. Future studies may wish to use individualized quality of life measures to further delineate the effects of different types of exercise on quality of life in older adults with low bone mass.

authors

  • Liu-Ambrose, Teresa YL
  • Khan, Karim M
  • Eng, Janice J
  • Lord, Stephen R
  • Lentle, Brian
  • McKay, Heather A

publication date

  • November 2005