The development of a tool to audit the safety policies and practices of community sports clubs Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Despite increased national effort directed at sports injury prevention in Australia since the mid 1990s, there is a lack of information available about the sports safety policies and practices of community sports clubs. The aim of this study was to develop a valid and reliable sports safety audit tool (SSAT) to identify these safety policies and practices. A literature review identified issues to be covered by the SSAT. Consultation with "experts" and piloting the SSAT with 19 community sports clubs in metropolitan Sydney established face and content validity. Test-retest reliability was assessed in six clubs. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using twenty-four independent representatives from eight clubs. Face and content validity studies identified issues to include in the SSAT and improvements to language and layout. Test-retest reliability was 91% (range 68-100%). Inter-rater reliability ranged from 40-65% when missing data and 'don't know' answers were included, and from 62-75% when only 'definitive' answers were included. Club presidents and secretaries provided more definitive information than other informants. A preliminary list of safety issues that clubs addressed well or poorly was identified. The SSAT is a useful tool for gathering baseline data, benchmarking and targeting sports safety interventions with community sports clubs. Club presidents and secretaries are the preferred contact point and a face-to-face interview is the best administration mode. A tool to identify safety policies and practices is now available for use by anyone supporting community sports clubs to improve safety.

publication date

  • June 2003