Uterine Preservation or Hysterectomy at Sacrospinous Colpopexy for Uterovaginal Prolapse? Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • This study retrospectively compared 34 women who had a sacrospinous hysteropexy and 36 who had a vaginal hysterectomy and sacrospinous fixation for symptomatic uterine prolapse. All women underwent independent review and examination, with a mean follow-up of 36 months in the hysterectomy group and 26 months in the hysteropexy group. The subjective success rate was 86% in the hysterectomy group and 78% in the hysteropexy group (P = 0.70). The objective success rate was 72% and 74%, respectively (P = 1.00). The patient-determined satisfaction rate was 86% in the hysterectomy group and 85% in the hysteropexy group (P = 1.00). The operating time in the hysterectomy group was 91 minutes, compared to 59 minutes in the hysteropexy group (P < 0.01). The mean intraoperative blood loss in the hysterectomy group was 402 ml, compared to 198 ml in the hysteropexy group (P < 0.01). The sacrospinous hysteropexy is effective in the treatment of uterine prolapse. Vaginal hysterectomy may not be necessary in the surgical treatment of uterine prolapse.

authors

  • Maher, CF
  • Cary, MP
  • Slack, MC
  • Murray, CJ
  • Milligan, M
  • Schluter, P

publication date

  • November 2001