An Exercise Protocol that Replicates Soccer Match-Play Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • This study compared the demands of a soccer match simulation (SMS) incorporating 90 min of soccer-specific movement with passing, dribbling and shooting skills with those of competitive match-play (match). 10 elite youth soccer players participated in SMS and match-play while ingesting fluid-electrolyte beverages. No differences existed between trials for mean HR (SMS, match: 158 ± 4 beats·min (-1), 160 ± 3 beats·min (-1); P = 0.587), peak HR (SMS, match: 197 ± 3 beats·min (-1), 197 ± 4 beats·min (-1); P = 0.935) and blood glucose concentrations (SMS, match: 4.5 ± 0.1 mmol·L (-1), 4.6 ± 0.2 mmol·L (-1); P = 0.170). Inter-trial coefficient of variation (with Bland and Altman limits of agreement) were 2.6% (-19.4-15.4 beats·min (-1)), 1.6% (-14.3-14.7 beats·min (-1)) and 5.0% (-0.9-0.7 mmol·L (-1)) for mean HR, peak HR and blood glucose concentrations. Although the pattern of blood lactate response was similar between trials, blood lactate concentrations were higher at 15 min in SMS when compared to match. Notably, blood glucose concentrations were depressed by 17 ± 4% and 19 ± 5% at 15 min after half-time during match-play and SMS, respectively. Time spent completing low-intensity, moderate-intensity and high-intensity activities were similar between trials ( P > 0.05). In conclusion, the SMS replicates the physiological demands of match-play while including technical actions.

publication date

  • July 2011