The association between pain catastrophising and kinesiophobia with pain and function in people with plantar heel pain Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Psychological variables, including catastrophic thoughts and kinesiophobia, are common in people with chronic musculoskeletal pain and are associated with pain and function. However, the role of each factor has not been evaluated in people with plantar heel pain (plantar fasciitis).Thirty-six participants diagnosed with plantar heel pain were recruited. Main outcome measures included the Pain Catastrophising Scale, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia, the Foot Health Status Questionnaire and a Visual Analogue Scale. Hierarchical regression models were developed to evaluate the association between each psychological variable with variations in foot pain, first step pain and foot function.In a full model with age, sex and BMI, kinesiophobia contributed to 21% of the variability in foot function and was a significant predictor in this model (Beta=-0.49, P=0.006). In a separate model, catastrophising explained 39% of the variability in foot function and was a significant predictor in this model (Beta=-0.65, P<0.001). Finally, pain catastrophising accounted for 18% of the variability in first step pain and was a significant predictor in a model that also included age, sex and BMI (Beta=0.44, P=0.008).After controlling for age, sex and BMI, kinesiophobia and catastrophising were significantly associated with foot function, while catastrophising was associated with first step pain in people with plantar heel pain. In addition to addressing biological factors in the management of plantar heel pain, clinicians should consider the potential role of pain catastrophising and kinesiophobia in this population.

publication date

  • 2017

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