Identification of a stem rust resistance locus effective against Ug99 on wheat chromosome 7AL using a RAD-Seq approach Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • A locus of major effect for stem rust resistance, effective against Ug99 and possibly a target of a suppressor on chromosome arm 7DL in wheat cultivar Canthatch, was mapped to 7AL. Wheat stem rust, caused by Puccinia graminis f. sp. tritici (Pgt), is responsible for major production losses around the world. The development of resistant cultivars is an effective and environmentally friendly way to manage the disease, but outbreaks can occur when new pathogen races overcome the existing host resistance genes. Ug99 (race TTKSK) and related Pgt races are virulent to the majority of existing cultivars, which presents a potential threat to global wheat production. The hexaploid wheat cultivar Canthatch has long been known to carry a suppressor of stem rust resistance on chromosome arm 7DL. Multiple "non-suppressor" mutants of Canthatch are reported to have gained resistance to Pgt races, including Ug99 (TTKSK) and related races TTKST and TTTSK. To genetically map the suppressor locus, a mapping population was developed from a cross between the susceptible cultivar Columbus, thought to possess the suppressor, and Columbus-NS766, a resistant, near-isogenic line believed to contain a mutant non-suppressor allele introgressed from Canthatch. Genetic mapping using a 9K SNP genotyping assay and restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (RAD-Seq) on bulked segregants led to the identification of markers linked to a locus of stem rust resistance. Surprisingly, genomic sequence information revealed the markers to be located on 7AL instead of 7DL, indicating that the resistance phenotype was due to a new resistance locus, rather than the inactivated suppressor. We suggest that the 7AL locus of resistance is most likely suppressed by the 7DL suppressor.

authors

  • Pujol, V
  • Forrest, KL
  • Zhang, P
  • Rouse, MN
  • Hayden, MJ
  • Huang, L
  • Tabe, L
  • Lagudah, E

publication date

  • 2015