The influence of a person-centred psychosocial unit climate on satisfaction with care and work Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • AIM: To describe nurses' satisfaction with care and work and to explore the extent to which a person-centred unit climate influenced this satisfaction. BACKGROUND: Although the concept of person-centred care is used to describe high-quality care, there is a shortage of studies exploring the relationship between person-centredness and nurses' satisfaction with care and work in acute care settings. METHODS: Registered nurses within a university hospital in Sweden (n = 206) completed the Satisfaction with Nursing Care and Work Assessment Scale and the Person-centred Climate Questionnaire. The data collected was analysed using descriptive and analytical statistics. DESIGN: Cross-sectional explorative study. RESULTS: The majority of respondents were satisfied with the care and work situation. Nurses with more than 9 years of work experience were more satisfied with care and work, and there were a significant association between a person-centred psychosocial climate of units and nurses' satisfaction with care and work. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided evidence for a significant association between person-centredness and the satisfaction with care and work of nurses in acute care environments. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Promoting and implementing a person-centred philosophy of care can be one way to improve nurses' satisfaction with care and work.

publication date

  • April 2012