IMPLEMENTING COMPUTERISED WORKLOAD DATA COLLECTION IN RURAL PRIMARY HEALTH CARE Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: Describes the implementation of a computerised information system to collect workload data and discusses feedback from staff evaluation of use and value. DESIGN: Feedback interviews following service implementation. SETTING: Remote rural primary health care, Scotland. SUBJECTS: Thirty-three primary health care staff. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Not relevant, as the study was service development with qualitative evaluation. RESULTS: Findings of evaluation interviews indicate a number of themes common to remote rural practice that make implementing a computerised information system problematical. These include: logistical problems caused by small practice teams and wide areas covered; inadequate allowance for recording of blurred roles and the wide range of non-clinical duties carried out; lack of local contextual and cultural information, which is necessary to make sense of data collected. Remote rural health professionals found reports from the system of limited value as they felt they already had good knowledge of local activities and had few opportunities, due to small teams, to use data for service redesign. CONCLUSION: Remote rural primary care is underpinned by a number of organisational and philosophical features that require understanding when considering the implementation of initiatives developed in an urban working environment.

publication date

  • February 2004