A putative RNA-binding protein has a role in virulence in Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Molecular signals contained in root exudates are thought to induce specific transcriptional changes in bacteria within the rhizosphere, promoting the expression of genes associated with rhizosphere function. We have previously used Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 as a model organism to identify novel genes with roles in rhizosphere competitiveness through analysis of those which showed altered transcription in response to root exudates. One such gene, PA4753, encodes a putative RNA-binding protein. Homologues of PA4753 occur in other rhizosphere-associated bacteria, including the phytopathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. In this study, we have tested the role of this homologue, Rsc1524, in the virulence of R. solanacearum GMI1000. Disruption of Rsc1524 resulted in a decrease in virulence in tomato and Arabidopsis. This was associated with an increase in the level of specific extracellular plant wall-degrading enzymes. Expression of Rsc1524 was influenced by different plant root exudates and root exudate components, which suggests that it may play a role in molecular signalling between bacteria and plants underpinning wilt pathogenesis.

authors

publication date

  • January 1, 2008