Studies on antibiotic biosynthesis by protoplasts and resting cells of Streptomyces echinatus. Part II. Effect of chromophore precursors Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Washed cell and protoplast suspensions from Streptomyces echinatus A8331, which produces the quinoxaline antibiotic echinomycin, have been used to study the effects of analogues of the natural chromophore upon antibiotic biosynthesis. Addition of quinoline-2-carboxylic acid caused a decrease in the labelling of echinomycin from L-[methyl-14C]methionine and an increase in labelled chloroform-extractable material. Quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid increased the incorporation of radioactivity into both fractions. Thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid, 6-methylquinoline-2-carboxylic acid, and quinoline-2-carboxylic acid (also to a lesser extent 7-chloroquinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid) increased markedly the incorporation of radioactivity into chloroform-extractable material and virtually abolished echinomycin synthesis. Autoradiographs of extracts from suspensions supplemented with the latter four analogues revealed bis-substituted metabolites not found in unsupplemented cultures. When protoplast suspensions were incubated with L-[U-14C]serine, L-[U-14C]valine, or DL-[benzene ring-U-14C]tryptophan, quinoline-2-carboxylic acid, thieno[3,2-b]pyridine-5-carboxylic acid, and 6-methylquinoline-2-carboxylic acid directed the synthesis of antibiotically active bis derivatives at the expense of echinomycin. When analogues of quinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid previously found unsuitable for incorporation by growing cultures were tested in protoplast suspensions, only isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid caused a large increase in the incorporation of radioactivity from L-[methyl-14C]methionine into chloroform-extractable material. With DL-[benzene ring-U-14C]tryptophan as the radiolabel, benzotriazoline-2-acetic acid and 6-bromoquinoxaline-2-carboxylic acid as well as isoquinoline-3-carboxylic acid sharply reduced the labelling of echinomycin.

publication date

  • May 1, 1986