Fibrinogen and associated risk factors in a high-risk population: urban indigenous australians, the druid Study Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Epidemiological evidence suggests that fibrinogen and CRP are associated with coronary heart disease risk. High CRP in Indigenous Australians has been reported in previous studies including our 'Diabetes and Related diseases in Urban Indigenous population in Darwin region' (DRUID) Study. We studied levels of fibrinogen and its cross-sectional relationship with traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors in an urban Indigenous Australian cohort. METHODS: Fibrinogen data were available from 287 males and 628 females (aged ≥ 15 years) from the DRUID study. Analysis was performed for associations with the following risk factors: diabetes, HbA1c, age, BMI, waist circumference, waist-hip ratio, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol, C-reactive protein, homocysteine, blood pressure, heart rate, urine ACR, smoking status, alcohol abstinence. RESULTS: Fibrinogen generally increased with age in both genders; levels by age group were higher than those previously reported in other populations, including Native Americans. Fibrinogen was higher in those with than without diabetes (4.24 vs 3.56 g/L, p < 0.001). After adjusting for age and sex, the following were significantly associated with fibrinogen: BMI, waist, waist-hip ratio, systolic blood pressure, heart rate, fasting triglycerides, HDL cholesterol, HbA1c, CRP, ACR and alcohol abstinence. On multivariate regression (age and sex-adjusted) CRP and HbA1c were significant independent predictors of fibrinogen, explaining 27% of its variance; CRP alone explained 25% of fibrinogen variance. On factor analysis, both CRP and fibrinogen clustered with obesity in women (this factor explained 20% of variance); but in men, CRP clustered with obesity (factor explained 18% of variance) whilst fibrinogen clustered with HbA1c and urine ACR (factor explained 13% of variance). CONCLUSIONS: Fibrinogen is associated with traditional and non-traditional cardiovascular risk factors in this urban Indigenous cohort and may be a useful biomarker of CVD in this high-risk population. The apparent different associations of fibrinogen with cardiovascular disease risk markers in men and women should be explored further.

authors

  • Maple-Brown, Louise J
  • Cunningham, Joan
  • Nandi, Nirjhar
  • Hodge, Allison
  • O'Dea, Kerin

publication date

  • 2010

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