Development and psychometric testing of the Clinician Readiness for Measuring Outcomes Scale Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: If allied health professionals are to begin measuring outcomes routinely, a change in attitudes and behaviour is necessary. However, individuals need to be ready to change and often move through several stages before practice change is observed. AIM: To develop and test the psychometric properties of a questionnaire that determines clinicians' readiness to measure outcomes. METHODS: A study of instrument development, validation and reliability. Ten expert allied health professionals were involved in content validity testing. A further 396 allied health professionals completed the questionnaire to establish content and construct validity, internal consistency and temporal reliability (or stability). Of these 396 allied health professionals, 70 participated in the temporal reliability assessment. Content validity was established using the Content Validity Index (CVI). Construct validity was determined using confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and internal consistency was ascertained using Cronbach's alpha. Temporal reliability was confirmed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 3,1). RESULTS: A 30-item questionnaire was developed, reflecting the five stages of change from the Transtheoretical Model of Change, and commonly cited barriers to outcome measurement. Content validity was excellent (CVI = 0.96). Using CFA, a two-factor model provided best fit. Based on CFA results, four items were dropped resulting in a 26-item questionnaire (range 26-156). Internal consistency reliability was excellent (alpha = 0.94). Temporal (stability) reliability ICC (3,1) was very good (r = 0.86, P = 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The final 26-item questionnaire takes 10 minutes to complete and 5 minutes to score. The Clinician Readiness for Measuring Outcomes Scale provides educators with useful information about clinician readiness and helps identify strategies for affecting behaviour change.

publication date

  • February 2009