Does the MIND diet decrease depression risk? A comparison with Mediterranean diet in the SUN cohort Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • To prospectively evaluate the association of the Mediterranean-DASH diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet and the Mediterranean diet (and their components), and depression risk.We followed-up (median 10.4 years) 15,980 adults initially free of depression at baseline or in the first 2 years of follow-up. Food consumption was measured at baseline through a validated food-frequency questionnaire, and was used to compute adherence to the MIND and the Mediterranean diets. Relationships between these two diets and incident depression were assessed through Cox regression models.We identified 666 cases of incident depression. Comparing the highest versus the lowest quartiles of adherence, we found no association of the MIND diet and incident depression. This relation was statistically significant for the Mediterranean diet {hazard ratio (HR) 0.75, [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.61, 0.94]; p < 0.01}, although with departure from linearity. A reduced depression risk was associated with higher consumption of both fruits and nuts [HR 0.82 (95% CI 0.69, 0.96); p = 0.02], moderate nuts consumption [HR 0.77 (95% CI 0.64, 0.93); p = 0.01], and avoidance of fast/fried food [HR 0.63 (95% CI 0.41, 0.96); p = 0.03].The Mediterranean diet was associated with reduced depression risk, but we found no evidence of such an association for the MIND diet.

authors

  • Fresán, Ujué
  • Bes-Rastrollo, Maira
  • Segovia-Siapco, Gina
  • Sanchez-Villegas, Almudena
  • Lahortiga, Francisca
  • de la Rosa, Pedro-Antonio
  • Martinez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel

publication date

  • 2018