Low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation and their partners — A preliminary prevalence study Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The prevalence of low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation, and their partners, is unknown. Individuals with chronic airflow limitation, and their respective partners, are likely to have several risk factors that may increase the predisposition for low back pain. The aim of the present study was to provide preliminary data on the prevalence of low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation, and their partners. METHOD: A cross-sectional observational study design was used. Individuals with chronic airflow limitation, and their partners, were approached at South Australian metropolitan Lung Support Group meetings and invited to participate in the study. Three commonly used questionnaires: the Medical Outcomes Survey Short-Form 36 (MOS SF-36); the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ); and the Nordic Low Back Pain Questionnaire (NLBPQ) were used to collect data on general health, respiratory health and low back pain prevalence, respectively. Odds ratios and independent Student's t-tests were used to analyse data by use of Epi Info Version 6.0 software. RESULTS: Sixty subjects participated in the study: 41 individuals with chronic airflow limitation and 19 partners of individuals with chronic airflow limitation. The lifetime, 12-month and seven-day prevalence of low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation was 69%, 58% and 31%, respectively. The prevalence of low back pain in the partners of individuals with chronic airflow limitation was found to be higher, at 74%, 68% and 58%, respectively. Four significant relationships between general and respiratory health, and low back pain were demonstrated for individuals with chronic airflow limitation. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation was comparable to the lifetime prevalence for the general and older population, and greater than the 12-month prevalence reported for the older population. The prevalence of low back pain for the partners of individuals with chronic airflow limitation was consistently higher than the lifetime and 12-month prevalence reported for individuals with chronic airflow limitation, the older population and family care workers. These findings suggest a larger prevalence study of low back pain in individuals with chronic airflow limitation, and their partners, is warranted.

publication date

  • November 2002