Type 5 phosphodiesterase inhibition by sildenafil abrogates acute smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Endothelial dysfunction is a key early event in the process of atherosclerosis and a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Sildenafil, an effective oral treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction, inhibits cGMP degradation by specific type 5 phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition. Sildenafil has been shown to improve vascular function, however, the effect of type 5 PDE inhibition on acute smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction is unknown. METHODS: We studied the effect of 50 mg of sildenafil on acute smoking-induced endothelial dysfunction in 14 male smokers according to a randomized, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Endothelial function was evaluated with flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasonography. RESULTS: Sildenafil abolishes the decrease in FMD of the brachial artery that is induced acutely by smoking (placebo/smoking session: from 4.56% +/- 0.60% to 2.80% +/- 0.43%, sildenafil/smoking session: from 3.83% +/- 0.64% to 4.33% +/- 0.47%, ie, improvement of 51%, P < .05). This was associated with no reversal effect of sildenafil on smoking-induced decrease in resting brachial artery diameter and with a partial reversal of the smoking-induced decrease in hyperemic brachial artery diameter (placebo/smoking session: from 4.68 +/- 0.13 mm to 4.53 +/- 0.15 mm, sildenafil/smoking session: from 4.72 +/- 0.12 mm to 4.64 +/- 0.13 mm, ie, improvement of 1.5%, P < .005). CONCLUSIONS: The present study shows, for the first time, that type 5 PDE inhibition with sildenafil abrogates the smoking-induced acute decrease in FMD of the brachial artery. These findings may have clinical implications given the detrimental consequences of smoking and the strategic role of normal endothelial function.

authors

  • VLACHOPOULOS, C
  • TSEKOURA, D
  • ALEXOPOULOS, N
  • PANAGIOTAKOS, D
  • AZNAOURIDIS, K
  • STEFANADIS, C

publication date

  • November 2004