A randomized trial of aggressive lipid reduction for improvement of myocardial ischemia, symptom status, and vascular function in patients with coronary artery disease not amenable to intervention Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • PURPOSE:To determine the effects of aggressive lipid lowering on markers of ischemia, resistance vessel function, atherosclerotic burden, and symptom status in patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease. METHODS:Sixty consecutive patients with coronary artery disease that was unsuitable for revascularization were assigned randomly to either usual therapy of lipids for patients with a low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol target level <116 mg/dL, or to a more aggressive lipid-lowering strategy involving up to 80 mg/d of atorvastatin, with a target LDL cholesterol level <77 mg/dL. The extent and severity of inducible ischemia (by dobutamine echocardiography), vascular function (brachial artery reactivity), atheroma burden (carotid intima-media thickness), and symptom status were evaluated blindly at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. RESULTS:After 12 weeks of treatment, patients in the aggressive therapy group had a significantly greater decrease in mean (+/- SD) LDL cholesterol level than those in the usual care group (29 +/- 38 mg/dL vs. 7 +/- 24 mg/dL, P = 0.03). Patients in the aggressive therapy group had a reduction in the number of ischemic wall segments (mean between-group difference of 1.3; 95% confidence interval: 0.1 to 2.0; P = 0.04), flow-mediated dilatation (mean between-group difference of 5.9%; 95% confidence interval: 2.5% to 9.4%; P = 0.001), and angina score after 12 weeks. There were no significant changes in atherosclerotic burden in either group. CONCLUSION:Patients with symptomatic coronary artery disease who are treated with aggressive lipid lowering have improvement of symptom status and ischemia that appears to reflect improved vascular function but not atheroma burden.

publication date

  • April 2003