Stillbirth in relation to maternal country of birth and other migration related factors: A population-based study in Norway Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • BACKGROUND:Migrant women's overall increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes is well known. The aim of this study was to investigate possible associations between stillbirth and maternal country of birth and other migration related factors (paternal origin, reason for immigration, length of residence and birthplace of firstborn child) in migrant women in Norway. METHODS:Nationwide population-based study including births to primiparous and multiparous migrant women (n = 198,520) and non-migrant women (n = 1,156,444) in Norway between 1990 and 2013. Data from the Medical Birth Registry of Norway and Statistics Norway. Associations were investigated by multiple logistic regression and reported as odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS:Primiparous women from Sri-Lanka and Pakistan, and multiparous women from Pakistan, Somalia, the Philippines and Former Yugoslavia had higher odds of stillbirth when compared to non-migrant women (adjusted OR ranged from 1.58 to 1.79 in primiparous and 1.50 to 1.71 in multiparous women). Primiparous migrant women whose babies were registered with Norwegian-born fathers had decreased odds of stillbirth compared to migrant women whose babies were registered with foreign-born fathers (aOR = 0.73; CI 0.58-0.93). Primiparous women migrating for work or education had decreased odds of stillbirth compared to Nordic migrants (aOR = 0.58; CI 0.39-0.88). Multiparous migrant women who had given birth to their first child before arriving in Norway had higher odds of stillbirth in later births in Norway compared with multiparous migrant women who had their first child after arrival (aOR = 1.28; CI 1.06-1.55). Stillbirth was not associated with length of residence in Norway. CONCLUSIONS:This study identifies sub-groups of migrant women who are at an increased risk of stillbirth, and highlights the need to improve care for them. More attention should be paid to women from certain countries, multiparous women who had their first baby before arrival and primiparous women whose babies have foreign-born fathers.

authors

  • Vik, Eline S
  • Aasheim, Vigdis
  • Schytt, Erica
  • Small, Rhonda
  • Moster, Dag
  • Nilsen, Roy M

publication date

  • 2019