Structure and homogeneity of pseudo-physiological phospholipid bilayers and their deposition characteristics on carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayers Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Supported phospholipid bilayers are frequently used to establish a pseudo-physiological environment required for the study of protein function or the design of enzyme-based biosensors and biocatalytic reactors. These membranes are deposited from bilayer vesicles (liposomes) that rupture and fuse into a planar membrane upon adhesion to a surface. However, the morphology and homogeneity of the resulting layer is affected by the characteristics of the precursor liposome suspension and the substrate. Here we show that two distinct liposome populations contribute to membrane formation--equilibrium liposomes and small unilamellar vesicles. Liposome deposition onto carboxylic acid terminated self-assembled monolayers resulted in planar mono- and multilayer, vesicular and composite membranes, as a function of liposome size and composition. Quartz crystal microbalance data provided estimates for layer thicknesses and sheer moduli and were used for classification of the final structure. Finally, atomic force microscopy data illustrated the inherently inhomogeneous and dynamic nature of these membranes.

authors

  • Mechler, Adam
  • Praporski, Slavica
  • Piantavigna, Stefania
  • Heaton, Steven M
  • Hall, Kristopher N
  • Aguilar, Marie-Isabel
  • Martin, Lisandra L

publication date

  • February 2009