An exploratory content analysis of how physiotherapists perceive barriers and facilitators to participation in physical activity among adults with disability Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Purpose: To explore the perceived barriers and facilitators to participation in physical activity among adults with disability, from the perspective of physiotherapists. Method: A convenience sample of 20 participants recruited from delegates attending a symposium at the 2015 Australian Physiotherapy Association conference. The participants completed a brief questionnaire. Content analysis was completed using an inductive approach. Results: Participants reported 18 facilitators and 18 barriers to participation in physical activity among adults with disability. The top five reported facilitators were as follows: having support (n = 17 responses), having a choice of opportunities (n = 10 responses), access to suitable venues and equipment (n = 10 responses), enjoying physical activity (n = 8 responses), and high self-efficacy (n = 7 responses). The top five reported barriers were as follows: reduced access to programs and opportunities (n = 15 responses), lack of support or social isolation (n = 14 responses), lack of transport (n = 7 responses), financial strain (n = 7 responses), and physical ability (n = 7 responses). Conclusions: Physiotherapists who have a strong interest in the physical activity habits of adults with disabilities recognize a wide range of facilitators and barriers to their participation. Psychosocial beliefs and behaviors (i.e., self-efficacy, motivation, fear, and attitude) of adults with disability might be more important influencers of physical activity participation than impairments of body structure and function.

publication date

  • 2019