Maternal Asian ethnicity and the risk of anal sphincter injury Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between maternal Asian ethnicity (South Asian and South East/East Asian) and anal sphincter injury. DESIGN: Retrospective cross-sectional study, comparing outcomes for Asian women with those of Australian and New Zealand women. SETTING: A large metropolitan maternity service in Victoria, Australia. POPULATION: Australian/New Zealand, South Asian and South East/East Asian women who had a singleton vaginal birth from 2006 to 2012. METHODS: The relation between maternal ethnicity and anal sphincter injury was assessed by logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Anal sphincter injury was defined as a third or fourth degree tear (with or without episiotomy). RESULTS: Among 32,653 vaginal births there was a significant difference in the rate of anal sphincter injury by maternal region of birth (p < 0.001). After adjustment for confounders, nulliparous women born in South Asian and South East/East Asia were 2.6 (95% confidence interval 2.2-3.3; p < 0.001) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.7-2.5; p < 0.001) times more likely to sustain an anal sphincter injury than Australian/New Zealand women, respectively. Parous women born in South Asian and South East/East Asia were 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.8-3.2; p < 0.001) and 2.0 (95% confidence interval 1.5-2.7; p < 0.001) times more likely to sustain an anal sphincter injury than Australian/New Zealand women, respectively. CONCLUSION: There are ethnic differences in the rates of anal sphincter injury not fully explained by known risk factors for such trauma. This may have implications for care provision.

authors

  • Davies-Tuck, Miranda
  • Biro, Mary-Anne
  • Mockler, Joanne
  • Stewart, Lynne
  • Wallace, Euan M
  • East, Christine

publication date

  • 2015

has subject area