Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT): Modified Delphi Study. Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Exercise interventions are often incompletely described in reports of clinical trials, hampering evaluation of results and replication and implementation into practice.The aim of this study was to develop a standardized method for reporting exercise programs in clinical trials: the Consensus on Exercise Reporting Template (CERT).Using the EQUATOR Network's methodological framework, 137 exercise experts were invited to participate in a Delphi consensus study. A list of 41 items was identified from a meta-epidemiologic study of 73 systematic reviews of exercise. For each item, participants indicated agreement on an 11-point rating scale. Consensus for item inclusion was defined a priori as greater than 70% agreement of respondents rating an item 7 or above. Three sequential rounds of anonymous online questionnaires and a Delphi workshop were used.There were 57 (response rate=42%), 54 (response rate=95%), and 49 (response rate=91%) respondents to rounds 1 through 3, respectively, from 11 countries and a range of disciplines. In round 1, 2 items were excluded; 24 items reached consensus for inclusion (8 items accepted in original format), and 16 items were revised in response to participant suggestions. Of 14 items in round 2, 3 were excluded, 11 reached consensus for inclusion (4 items accepted in original format), and 7 were reworded. Sixteen items were included in round 3, and all items reached greater than 70% consensus for inclusion.The views of included Delphi panelists may differ from those of experts who declined participation and may not fully represent the views of all exercise experts.The CERT, a 16-item checklist developed by an international panel of exercise experts, is designed to improve the reporting of exercise programs in all evaluative study designs and contains 7 categories: materials, provider, delivery, location, dosage, tailoring, and compliance. The CERT will encourage transparency, improve trial interpretation and replication, and facilitate implementation of effective exercise interventions into practice.

authors

  • Slade, SC
  • Dionne, CE
  • Underwood, M
  • Buchbinder, R
  • Beck, B
  • Bennell, K
  • Brosseau, L
  • Costa, L
  • Cramp, F
  • Cup, E
  • Feehan, L
  • Ferreira, M
  • Forbes, S
  • Glasziou, P
  • Habets, B
  • Harris, S
  • Hay-Smith, J
  • Hillier, S
  • Hinman, R
  • Holland, A
  • Hondras, M
  • Kelly, G
  • Kent, P
  • Lauret, G-J
  • Long, A
  • Maher, C
  • Morso, L
  • Osteras, N
  • Peterson, T
  • Quinlivan, R
  • Rees, K
  • Regnaux, J-P
  • Rietberg, M
  • Saunders, D
  • Skoetz, N
  • Sogaard, K
  • Takken, T
  • van Tulder, M
  • Voet, N
  • Ward, L
  • White, C

publication date

  • 2016