Patterns of family responses to alcohol and tobacco problems Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • Patterns of family response to drinking and smoking were studied in a sample of 1034 adults in Ontario in 1993. Concerning tobacco smoking, 69% of respondents reported having said something to a relative and 82% to a friend; concerning drinking, 46% had said something to a relative and 65% to a friend. Having said something did not vary much with the respondent's age, educational level and smoking or drinking status, except that current smokers were less likely than others to have said something to a friend or acquaintance, while heavier drinkers were more likely to have said something to a friend or acquaintance, and ex-drinkers were more likely to have said something to a relative. About half of all who had ever smoked reported a family member (57%) or a friend (47%) had said something to them about their smoking, compared with much smaller proportions of ever-drinkers who reported that a family member (14%) or a friend (8%) had ever said anything about their drinking. Both drinking and smoking are recognized by many respondents as imposing burdens on the family. Family members often comment on drinking and smoking, and make suggestions about cutting down or quitting.

publication date

  • June 1, 1996