Motivation for sports participation, injury prevention expectations, injury risk perceptions and health problems in youth floorball players Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • PURPOSE:Describe the motivation for floorball participation, injury prevention expectations, injury risk perceptions and prevalence of health problems in youth floorball players at the start of the season. METHODS:This cross-sectional survey is part of a larger Sport Without Injury ProgrammE (SWIPE) project and provides baseline data before a cluster randomised controlled trial of an injury prevention program (Knee Control). A baseline survey (online and paper based) was collected from 47 teams with 471 youth floorball players from two provinces of Sweden before the start of the 2017 season. RESULTS:The mean age for 140 females and 331 males was 13.7 (± 1.5) and 13.3 (± 1.0) years, respectively. The two most significant motivators for floorball participation were being part of the team (82% females, 75% males) and friends (65% females, 70% males). Fractures (84% females, 90% males), eye injuries (90% females, 83% males) and concussion (82% females, 83% males) were perceived as the most severe injuries. 93% of players believed that sports injuries can be prevented, while 74% believed it is unlikely that they will sustain an injury. Existing health problems at the beginning of the season were prevalent in 33% of players, with 65% being injuries and 35% illnesses. 17% of existing injuries at the start of the season caused time-loss from play and 17% required medical attention. CONCLUSION:Social aspects were the greatest motivators for floorball participation in youths, suggesting that these factors are important to retain sports participants. The high number of health problems in youth is a concern; as such more effort, resources and priority should be given to sports safety programs. Many players believed that sports injuries can be prevented, possibly providing a fertile ground for implementation of such programs. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE:IV.

publication date

  • 2019