A pilot randomized control trial investigating the effect of mindfulness practice on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, and physiological activity Academic Article uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effect of mindfulness training on pain tolerance, psychological well-being, physiological activity, and the acquisition of mindfulness skills. METHODS: Forty-two asymptomatic University students participated in a randomized, single-blind, active control pilot study. Participants in the experimental condition were offered six (1-h) mindfulness sessions; control participants were offered two (1-h) Guided Visual Imagery sessions. Both groups were provided with practice CDs and encouraged to practice daily. Pre-post pain tolerance (cold pressor test), mood, blood pressure, pulse, and mindfulness skills were obtained. RESULTS: Pain tolerance significantly increased in the mindfulness condition only. There was a strong trend indicating that mindfulness skills increased in the mindfulness condition, but this was not related to improved pain tolerance. Diastolic blood pressure significantly decreased in both conditions. CONCLUSION: Mindfulness training did increase pain tolerance, but this was not related to the acquisition of mindfulness skills.

publication date

  • March 2007